Caroline Gagné, artiste

Quand un arbre tombe on l'entend;

[A falling tree makes more noise than a growing forest]
Vibrating Sound Installation

2018
Summary
A falling tree makes more noise than a growing forest is an African proverb that asks us to reflect on the idea that the loudest events are not necessarily the most important ones. It makes us understand that essential things are often created in the face of indifference and over time. Firstly, there is a connection to wear and tear as the breaking point of something: a tree breaks. Secondly, there is an imperceptible process based on the passage of time: the forest grows. 

The work in the space
The noise of a tree branch—which, in the blowing wind, sounded like a bow grazing a metal gangway—was the catalyst for this work. Based on this sound, I created a sculpture that pulsates with micromovements generated by pre-recorded sounds in real time. A vibration sensor attached to the structure makes it possible to show, or translate, these vibrations into a short video playing in a loop on the screen of a modified cellular phone. 
For visitors, the work appears as a listening device, demonstrating a sonic but also a visual composition. It allows visitors to immerse themselves in the multiple elements they can see and hear, in addition to the significant resonances of the place, which include the shadows being created on the floor, the volumes generated by the delicate, free-standing structure in the space, as well as the video discreetly installed between the two. 
Production of the device: Artificiel
Production of the metal structure: Che Bourgault
Vectorization of the cut-up drawings: Félix LeBlanc
Collaborators: Christophe Havard and Avatar
Documentation: Marion Gotti and Alexis Bellavance
The project was made possible thanks to the support of the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec.

Production
2018, Artificiel, Montréal

Diffusion
2019, Occurrence - Espace d’art et d'essai contemporains, Montréal,
Art et science - Trajectoire des sens, 
8e Biennale nationale de sculpture contemporaine, Trois-Rivières
,
Commissaire : Émilie Granjon

Summary
​A falling tree makes more noise than a growing forest is an African proverb that asks us to reflect on the idea that the loudest events are not necessarily the most important ones. It makes us understand that essential things are often created in the face of indifference and over time. Firstly, there is a connection to wear and tear as the breaking point of something: a tree breaks. Secondly, there is an imperceptible process based on the passage of time: the forest grows. 


The work in the space
The noise of a tree branch—which, in the blowing wind, sounded like a bow grazing a metal gangway—was the catalyst for this work. Based on this sound, I created a sculpture that pulsates with micromovements generated by pre-recorded sounds in real time. A vibration sensor attached to the structure makes it possible to show, or translate, these vibrations into a short video playing in a loop on the screen of a modified cellular phone. 

For visitors, the work appears as a listening device, demonstrating a sonic but also a visual composition. It allows visitors to immerse themselves in the multiple elements they can see and hear, in addition to the significant resonances of the place, which include the shadows being created on the floor, the volumes generated by the delicate, free-standing structure in the space, as well as the video discreetly installed between the two. 
Production of the device: Artificiel

Production of the metal structure: Che Bourgault
Vectorization of the cut-up drawings: Félix LeBlanc
Collaborators: Christophe Havard and Avatar
Documentation: Marion Gotti and Alexis Bellavance
The project was made possible thanks to the support of the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec.

Photos

Contexte

Extraits sonores